Traffic Jam

DeAsia McCorvey, Co-Editor-in-Chief

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Have you ever tried to make it from the outside portables to room 200 in under 3 minutes? Trying to get to a class just a few doors down is a daily struggle. Why? Because navigating the hallway is literal hell; the amount of kids who walk one foot per minute is insane. Teachers and students alike know and live the daily struggle of passing through the hallways. I’ve seen teachers have as much trouble as students trying to navigate the sea of stopped backpacks. The thing is, there are multiple types of people who crowd the hallway, and being able to identify these groups will help save you time as you plan your desired route.

The most common and annoying of all the hallway obstacles is the “Group Huddle.” This is a group of friends who just decide to stop and congregate in the middle of the hallway, not caring that they are taking up 85% of the walking space, but then having the AUDACITY to get mad if/when you bump into them! 

The next hallway group is the “Snails.” These are the slowest walkers in the hallway and if you are stuck behind one of them you’re essentially stuck in place until you can speed past them. BUT, more likely than not, the other side of traffic won’t allow for that maneuver. 

The “Stop and Look” occurs when a person is walking and their friend walks past and starts talking, which causes them to stop and talk too, forcing the people walking behind them to now be forced to walk around (hopefully not getting stuck behind one of the Snails.)

Another personal UNFAVORITE of mine is the “Stop and Turn,” which is very similar to the “Stop and Look,” but instead of talking to someone, they just do a hard stop before rapidly turning around while making the person behind them almost bump into them and possibly trip over their own feet. 

All of these people are extremely annoying, especially if you have a teacher who gives you detention if you’re late to their class, not accepting that it is not your fault because you were walking behind a literal snail. In conclusion, students if you’re going to walk 1⁄2 a foot per minute, PLEASE get out of my way so I can get to class on time.